Is a metal roof better?

Whether you want to put a roof on a new home, or your existing room requires an upgrade, there are several options available. But no matter the room preference you have in mind, metal roofs are some of the most reasonable options that are available out there today. They provide several benefits over the conventional roofing options. More so, they are several types of metal categories to choose from including copper, aluminum, zinc, tin, and steel. The only important factor is that you should ensure that the roof is tested and verified for optimal quality. One might ask is a metal roof better?

Well, the answer to this is dependent on various factors. With that being said, metal roofs tend to provide more benefits over the conventional types of roofs. There are several different brands and products when it comes to roofing products. For this reason, it’s important to make informed choices for the best value for your investment. Metal can be used as roofing material in various methods. Some of the main forms include sheet-like panels, which may be profiled or flat. Also, these roofs may also be formed on site or perhaps used to create shingles, which are shaped in the same way as tiles. The conventional sheet metal roofing is often combined by rolled joints or standing seams.

In most cases, these don’t have any exposed mechanical fasteners, though they comprise of a clipped or rolled design. This helps to develop a distinctive projecting seam. More so, this is a flexible system that can be pre-developed or formed on site. Additionally, it may also be used to develop curved or straight seams for added performance. There are several types of corrugated and profiled metal roof panels available. These are in most cases used in industrial settings for as many different applications.

Types of metal

The conventional roofing materials are normally developed using steel and aluminum. They are often economical and simple to work. More so, these roofs tend to be durable and able to accommodate several types of finishes. Steel is much heavier than the conventional metal options. As a result, it is sturdier, and it can be coated with several finishes to provide rust protection and corrosion resistance. It can also be coated to provide color and added durability benefits. Some of the other main types of metals that are available for roofing applications include:

Copper- copper has been used for many generations for both industrial and residential applications. It is readily available and affordable as well, which makes it a preferable material for most roofs.

Alloy roofs- this comprises of a unique mixture of metals, which are designed to provide optimal strength and durability benefits. The allow roofs tend to be much heavier and expensive due to their improved structural benefits.

Stainless steel- this type of metal is designed to provide rust and corrosion resistant benefits. Steel is one of the main materials when it comes to roof development. It is readily available, and it also has superior structural benefits.

Zinc- this is a versatile, malleable and corrosion resistant material as well. However, it tends to be more expensive than the conventional roofing materials. Zinc is in most cases mixed with other metals for form durable alloys.

Lead- this is a heavy and expensive material. It can be cut and manufactured easily, which makes it an affordable option for various roofing applications

Advantages of metal roofs

Metal roofs offer many benefits, including:

Longevity- metal roofs can last more than the conventional roofs. In fact, a metal roof can average in between 4—70 years in relation to the quality of the material. The conventional asphalt roofing materials tend to have a rather limited lifespan,

Durability- some metals can also withstand lots of wind. The roofs can withstand bad weather and powerful winds. More so, the roofs will not crack or corrode, and they also provide impact resistant benefits. With that being said, the roofs should regularly be inspected to ensure that it’s never prone to damage.

Safety- metal roofs will nor spark into flames, even in the likelihood of sparks of bad weather patterns. Metal roods are more sturdy which makes the perfect for roofing applications.

Energy efficient- metal roofs tend to be perfect for the radiant heat from the sun. This can play an important role in reducing cooling costs by as much as 25%

Environmentally friendly- the conventional roofs tend to have an average of 25-95% recycled contents. More so, these roofs are also entirely recyclable after use. On the contrary, roofs such as shingles tend to tear off, and waste ends up as part of the building.

Other benefits

Metal roofs also tend to be more compact and straightforward to install on the existing roofs. In fact, a lightweight roof is practical for large structures, since it plays a vital role in its structural integrity. Despite that metal roofs are light, they are often designed to provide improved durability and structural benefits for your needs. In most cases, this is because the metal roof has special interlocking panels for enhanced structural durability.

Conclusion

In taking all thing into consideration, there are various types of materials that can be used for the roofing procedure. In particular, metal roofs are designed to provide several design and functionality benefits for your needs. Whether you want the roof for commercial or residential settings, metal roofs are some of the most practical options available. The added benefit is there are different types of roofing product and brands.

Lane Crawford Beijing

Lane Crawford, Hong Kong’s well-loved answer to Saks Fifth Avenue, landed its only mainland branch in Bejing at Seasons
Place Mall in 2007. Lane Crawford Seasons Place features more than 600 high-end designer brands, including Commes
des Garçons, Dries Van Noten, Rick Owens, Stella McCartney and Vanessa Bruno, many of them exclusively available in
China. The flagship store sprawls over three levels and features sumptuous and innovative interior design with monolithic
shapes and unique artistic materials that combine the space as the epitome of elegance and grace.

Jewelry Stores in Beijing – Shopping for Gold, Jade, Pearl and Accessories

Beijing Fine Jewelers

A favorite in the expat community, this is the place to go if you’re looking for custom-made
jewelry. They’re happy to accommodate your own designs and even have knockoffs of
Tiffany and Cartier designs. It’s great for gold and silver jewelry, though the quality of
platinum is shaky.

Beijing Caishikou Department Store (Caibai Jewelry, Caibai shoushi, Caibai
gongsi,

Jade

Beijing’s largest gold jewelry retailer, Caishikou Department Store (Caibai Jewelry), has
been in the top gold sale spot for the past seventeen years. It is voted as one of Beijing
Top Ten Franchised Brands in 2007. Caibai Jewelery includes Gold, 99.9% Gold
Accessories, 99.9% Gold Ornaments, Gold bar, Platinum, Diamond, Jade, Gold and Silver
Coins and Badges, Beijing Olympic products, K-gold Accessories. Caibai is also the
concessionary retailer of Beijing Olympic souvenirs and gold coins.

Beijing Arts and Crafts Central Store (Gong Mei Dasha)

Jade

At this large jade store, you’re guaranteed to get teh real thing rather than the colored
glass you might find elsewhere. Bargain down to a third of the market price. Jewellery
(gold, silver, jade and pearl) is on the ground floor, with glass, paintings, calligraphy and
fans on the 2nd floor. You can find woodcarvings, cloisonné, lacquerware and silks on the
3rd floor and jade carvings on the 4th floor.

Hongqiao Pearl Market

Pearl earings

Pears are one of the many item sold at this market. Also available are Cultural Revolution
kitsch, typical brand-name clothing, luggage, and watches. The Pearls are a big draw,
however, and are sold in every size, shape, and color, with a similarly vast range in price.

Yin Shu + EA West

Unique industrial-looking jewelry by artist Man Kaihui, this boutique also sells locally-
designed sweaters and dresses.

Hong Julie

Gold Ring- Double Happiness

For something more traditionally Chinese, beautifully crafted and made using the finest
materials, Julie designs and oversees a range of jewelery sold from her three outlets in
the city. Created with jade from the southern Yunan Province, turquoise from Hubei
Province, pearls and lapis lazuli and ranging from RMB500 to RMB 20,000, it’s the perfect
place to come for something special.

 

Shard Box Store (Shendege Gongyipin

Shard Boxes are made from fragments of porcelain vesselsThe shard boxes-sposedly made from fragments of porcelain vessels smashed during

the Cultural Revolution – are gorgeous. Birds, trees,pining lovers, and dragons decorate
these affordable ceramic-and-metal containers. Most notably customers are former First
Lady Rosalyn Carter and Senator Hillary Clinton.

Beijing Fashion Shopping Guide – Fashion Designer and Boutiques

Exception de Mixmind

A graduate of the Suzhou Institute of Silk Textile Technology, Changchun-born Ma Ke held her
debut fashion show in 1995, before launching her ready-to-wear women’s collection (Exception
de Mixmind) in 1996. This respected Guangzhou-based chain uses high-quality knitwear, funky
linens, and soft cottons to create edgy clothing that’s functional, minimalist and statement-
making. Definitely a place to check out if you’re looking to support innovative Chinese design.

other two locations:
1)Sogo store

3.3 Fashion Mall

If it weren’t for the overpricing and snobbish attitude of the shop assistants, this six-story mall
would be the best place in Beijing to browse the city’s quirkiest fashion boutiques. 3.3’s still
worth a visit, however, as its 300-plus stores are crammed with local and imported goods and
increasing numbers of local designers are beginning to set up shop within.

Nali Mall

Tucked in behind Salitun’s busy bar street, this short strip of stores offers an intimate shopping
experience. Thoush it’s more expensive, the selections are more distinctive and the salesgirls
less cloying and annoying than those found
at Xiushui and Yaxiu market. Carrying modern designers like Philip Lim and Marni.
Plastered T-Shirts

The recent gentrification of Nanluoguxiang Hutong is due in part to the planned razing of older
developments, and in part to the entrepreneurial spirit of bar and restaurant owners, who
advertise free Wi-Fi and cheap Tsingtao beer. Directly across from the Downtown Backpackers
Hostel, two British lads have raised the ante for T-shirt shopping. Shop here for T-shirts with
Chinese slogans, pictures of Gong Bao Ji Ding — the foreign-friendly dish of chicken, peppers,
and peanuts — or opt for one that captures those nostalgic days of Old Peking. It’s on the
expensive side, but fun for the kitsch.

Red Phoenix

Ask anyone in the know which local designer teh rich and famous go to and they’ll tell you Gu
Lin. Her modest boutique at the top of the Sanlitun Bar Strret houses a small collection of
trademark silk embroidered gowns, Tibetan-inspired qipaos, jackets, tops and dresses and is
the perfect place to find modern clothing with beautiful Chinese finishing touches.

Ritan Office Building (Ritan Shangwu Luo)

Don’t let the gray-brick and red-trim exterior fool you: Ritan Office Building is a newly discovered
shopping paradise and very popular among Beijing locals looking for latest fashions. More than
70 shops stocking high-quality womens’ clothing, footwear, and accessories. Name brands
include Ann Taylor, BCBG, DKNY, and Eileen Fisher.

Shanghai Tang

Shanghai Tang is the only Chinese luxury brand: the apogee of the Chinese Art of Living and
Chinese Creativity. The name Shanghai Tang was derived from the Chinese translation of the
famous embankment in Shanghai known as “The Bund.” Launched in 1994. This Hong Kong
based international retailer is the ambassador for modern Chinese Style. Their clothes feature
luxurious knits and silks worked into innovative Chinese designs.

Other locations in Beijing
Beijing Capital International Airport

Beijing Capital International Airport

Though Tongli Studio is overhyped, this cluster of internationally owned boutiques, cafes, and
rooftop bars are worth a gander if you’re already cruising Sanlitun. Feng Ling Fashion
displays sexy thigh-high embroidered silk boots and punky qipaos emblazoned with red stars
(Feng Ling also has a boutique at 798 Art District, Tianzi). At Things of the Jing, Londeoner
Gabrielle Harris alchemizes silver with images of feudal-ear Chinese women to create funky-
elegant earrrings and pendants.

Vivienne Tam

This Hong Kong-born New York designer’s first Beijing boutique opened in the China World Mall
in 2006 -something of a surprise given that Tam made the Mao jacket fashionable and
presented her 2002 collection on the Great Wall. The shop features silk dresses, chiffon tops,
comfortable trousers and dozens of other versatile creations to suit all ages.

Clothes, Fashion and Tailor Stores in Beijing

A graduate of the Suzhou Institute of Silk Textile Technology, Changchun-born Ma Ke held
her debut fashion show in 1995, before launching her ready-to-wear women’s collection
(Exception de Mixmind) in 1996. This respected Guangzhou-based chain uses high-quality
knitwear, funky linens, and soft cottons to create edgy clothing that’s functional, minimalist
and statement-making. Definitely a place to check out if you’re looking to support innovative
Chinese design.

other two locations:
1)Sogo store

3.3 Fashion Mall

If it weren’t for the overpricing and snobbish attitude of the shop assistants, this six-story mall
would be the best place in Beijing to browse the city’s quirkiest fashion boutiques. 3.3’s still
worth a visit, however, as its 300-plus stores are crammed with local and imported goods and
increasing numbers of local designers are beginning to set up shop within.

Jimmy & Tommy Foreign Trade Fashion Club

If clothes shopping has been a frustrating experience with the bargaining too hard and the
clothes too small, the rows and rows of casual fashions in Western sizes at Jimmy&Timmy may
be a balm to your soul. For once, men have it better than women and menswear dominates.
Tightly packed rails filled with Ralph Lauren shires, Abercrombie and Fitch sweaters and gap
chinos are bargain priced-around 70 RMB for a shirt- and absolutely no bargaining is
accepted. It’s also good for men’s shoes.

Nali Mall

Tucked in behind Salitun’s busy bar street, this short strip of stores offers an intimate
shopping experience. Thoush it’s more expensive, the selections are more distinctive and the
salesgirls less cloying and annoying than those found
at Xiushui and Yaxiu market. Carrying modern designers like Philip Lim and Marni.

Noise

For funky T-shirts and gifts, Noise, run by a Singaporean and Chinese combo, is a must-visit.
The arty T-shirts bearing funky designs or sly slogans cost 250RMB and cotton retro-style
bags made from recycled material are under 200RMB.

The recent gentrification of Nanluoguxiang Hutong is due in part to the planned razing of
older developments, and in part to the entrepreneurial spirit of bar and restaurant owners,
who advertise free Wi-Fi and cheap Tsingtao beer. Directly across from the Downtown
Backpackers Hostel, two British lads have raised the ante for T-shirt shopping. Shop here for
T-shirts with Chinese slogans, pictures of Gong Bao Ji Ding — the foreign-friendly dish of
chicken, peppers, and peanuts — or opt for one that captures those nostalgic days of Old
Peking. It’s on the expensive side, but fun for the kitsch.

Ask anyone in the know which local designer the rich and famous go to and they’ll tell you Gu
Lin. Her modest boutique at the top of the Sanlitun Bar Strret houses a small collection of
trademark silk embroidered gowns, Tibetan-inspired qipaos, jackets, tops and dresses and is
the perfect place to find modern clothing with beautiful Chinese finishing touches.

Ritan Office Building

Don’t let the gray-brick and red-trim exterior fool you: Ritan Office Building is a newly
discovered shopping paradise and very popular among Beijing locals looking for latest
fashions. More than 70 shops stocking high-quality womens’ clothing, footwear, and
accessories. Name brands include Ann Taylor, BCBG, DKNY, and Eileen Fisher.

Shanghai Tang is the only Chinese luxury brand: the apogee of the Chinese Art of Living and
Chinese Creativity. The name Shanghai Tang was derived from the Chinese translation of the
famous embankment in Shanghai known as “The Bund.” Launched in 1994. This Hong Kong
based international retailer is the ambassador for modern Chinese Style. Their clothes
feature luxurious knits and silks worked into innovative Chinese designs.

Other Shanghai Tang locations in Beijing
2)Beijing Capital International Airport
Address: International Departure Lounge, Boarding Gate No 12

3)Beijing Capital International Airport

Though Tongli Studio is overhyped, this cluster of internationally owned boutiques, cafes, and
rooftop bars are worth a gander if you’re already cruising Sanlitun. Feng Ling Fashion
displays sexy thigh-high embroidered silk boots and punky qipaos emblazoned with red stars
(Feng Ling also has a boutique at 798 Art District, Tianzi). At Things of the Jing,
Londeoner Gabrielle Harris alchemizes silver with images of feudal-ear Chinese women to
create funky-elegant earrrings and pendants.

If you’re in the market for designer labels, try one of China’s handful of international
successes and the most wearable. The Cantonese-born designer does not have the fame
she deserves, so that means you won’t see her clothes on all your friends. While colors are
muted, the chinoiserie designs, including kitschy Chinese prints on luxury fabrics as well as
more sedate and grown-up cashmere evening dresses with cutouts similar to the style you
see on Ming dynasty furniture, are lovely if expensive, but the clothes are beautifully made.

Conveniently located near the city’s embassy district, this chaoyang tailor is popular with
those in the diplomatic community, the barebones setup is easy to overlook given the shop’s
reputation for fitting.

Wu Ba’s mixture of homegrown floaty fashions are Western-designer factory sample make it a
prime destination for Beijing’s fashionistas looking for something stylish on a budget.

Wenyu Yogurt Shop

This little store, one of Beijing’s best yogurt shops, serves fantastic Imperial dairy snacks. The
sweet custard-like dessert comes in a variety of flavors—coffee, honeydew, taro, strawberry
and papaya—and is extremely popular among Chinese who pile in morning, noon and night.
The shop closes when it sells out the day’s stock. Go in the early afternoon before the
popular flavors (or everything) are gone. The mostWenyu Nailaodian popular dessert is hongdou shuangpinai

Liqun Roat Duck Restaurant – Liqun Kaoya Dian – Peking Duck Liqian Duck Restaurant

Juicy, Whole ducks roasting in a traditional oven greet you upon this
simple courtyard house. It’s a small, casual, family-run restaurant far from
the crowds and commercialism of Da Dong and Quanjude ,
S Famous Peking Duck eateries of Li Qun IS A Choice Option for Those WHO Enjoy A Good.
Treasure Hunt: The Restaurant IS hidden Deep in A Hutong Neighborhood.
There are MANY Hand-painted Signs in Dictionary Dictionary English and IT Should Take About 10
minutes to Walk there From the Chongwenmen Xi Dajie. It’s so well known by
locals, however, when they see foreigners coming down the street, they
automatically point in the restaurant’s direction. Sure, the restrooms and
dining room are a bit shabby, Peking duck is slapped unceremonisco presented
Your very inelegant table, but what a duck it is – tender and juicy, and
served with delicate, paper-thin pancakes. The menu offers 30 duck tables
besides the classic,
do not want to know about. Ask for an English menu and feast to your heart’s
content! Reservations essential.
Traditional Oven Roasting a duck at Liqun KaoYa Dian

Capital M – Beijing Dining

It took seven years for Melbourne-born restaurateur Michelle Garnaut
(owner and founder of the legendary M on the Fringe in Hong Kong
and Shanghai’s most popular restaurant M on the Bund) to make
Capital M a reality. The results appear to have been well worth the
effort.

Housed in a traditional building at the entrance to Beijing’s historic
Qianmen Street, its location could hardly be more prestigious.
Thankfully the designers of the space have been clever to adapt the
interior to its surroundings, and Capital M exudes a stately
confidence; a glamorous yet understated style very different from the
ultra-chic pink and black hues of M on the Bund or the relaxing, rustic
shades of M at the Fringe. A black and white parquet floor runs
through the bar and dining rooms, setting off the bold mural that
decorates the back wall. The north-facing windows afford superb
views of Zhengyanmen and Tiananmen Square, while open fires
punctuate both the bar and the main dining room – a stylish addition
with added appeal as the city plunges into winter.

Dinner at Capital M is, therefore, something of an event, and any meal
here should be preceded by an expertly-made cocktail in the bar
overlooking the Square. M could easily be pretentious but, like its
Australian proprietor, it has a frivolous, down-to-earth side. The menu,
grounded in seasonal tastes, will change every few months. The twice-
cooked pigeon with boudin noir and Harissa (¥112) is tender, well
presented and satisfyingly crispy on the outside. The dish even
comes with a finger bowl so you don’t feel uncouth gnawing on the
bones to get to every last delicious mouthful. Of the main courses, the
most popular item has proved to be the crispy suckling pig, done with
roasted root vegetables and apple sauce. The pig comes almost
Chinese style, with a substantial layer of fat cushioning the meat and
top layer of crispy skin, but it’s good and juicy as a result. However,
while the starter portion of soup is on the small (if sensible) side, the
slow-baked, salt-encased leg of lamb with smashed yams, sautéed
spinach and sweet glazed shallots has the opposite problem.
Our favorite appetizer was the tortelli with pumpkin, ricotta and
mustard fruits (¥98), served with crispy sage and butter sauce with
hints of citrus. The hothouse-smoked salmon served with sautéed
spinach and an organic poached egg (¥248), while certainly healthy,
was a little bland. The risotto with mushrooms, mascarpone and rocket
(¥188) had a much richer flavor and is a good choice for a chilly night.

After the view, the most impressive thing about M is the grand dessert
platter (¥108/person). The two tiers of sweets include an outstanding
crème brulee and a large slice of M’s famous pavlova, deliciously
accentuated with passion fruit sauce. A wonderful place for a cocktail,
special dinner or even Sunday brunch, Capital M is quite simply a
treat from start to finishThe Capital M restaurant in Beijing

Capital M_View of Zhengyanmen GateCapital M's lounge area

Capital M_ M's signature pavlova dessert

Capital_M_-_smoked_salmon

Most Popular Bars and Clubs in Beijing

Beijing’s main expat-friendly boozing district, Sanlitun (Chinese) is famed for its “Bar Street”, more properly known as
Sanlitun Bei Lu, a north-south strip of drinking establishments a long block east of the Workers’ Stadium that at one time
contained practically all of the city’s bars. The fastest-growing spot for late-night drinking is the Back Lakes (Shicha Hai or Hou
Hai), a previously serene spot with a few discreetly fashionable bars north of Bei Hai Park which has exploded into a riot of
neon, capped by the ghastly Lotus Lane. Perhaps the most notable trend is the resurgence of hotel bars, which are the most
appealing and stylish drinking options in Beijing, most notably Centro (Kerry Center), Red Moon (Grand Hyatt) and Aria
Lan Club
Formal, but not intimidating” is how designer Philippe Starck describes his creation. The opulence of this huge luxury venue is
matched by the attention to detail behind the bar, which is stocked with a vast array of European and New World wines. Guests
can choose between a restaurant, a lounge that features live entertainment and DJs most nights, an Oyster Bar, a cocktail bar,
a cigar room and 45 private VIP Rooms.
The Tree
A huge favorite among the city’s expats, formerly the Hidden Tree this place is a convivial, stone-floored pub that marries a
fantastic array of beers (40 Belgian brews alone) with some of the best wood-fired pizzas in Beijing.

Bed Tapas and Bar
A short walk north of the Drum and Bell Towers, Bed Tapas & Bar is the perfect Beijing bar – an old courtyard house kitted out
with antique furniture, including kang-style beds. Excellent food, plus weekend DJs.
Centro
It may be a hotel bar but it’s Beijing’s classiest bar where you can guarantee to find a crowd and, quite possibly, visiting rock
stars, government ministers and Chinese film directors. A giant bar, spacious lounging areas, a stage, a private room, wine
cellars – the Kerry Centre’s bar is well-designed and branded right down to the carpets, but far from being oppressive and
overdone, Centro is a surprisingly comfortable spot to down a drink and do your best Cary Grant impression. Nightly live jazz
performances. Now boasting two happy hours. Happy hour 5-8pm daily.

  • Centro 

It may be a hotel bar but it’s Beijing’s classiest bar where you can guarantee to find a crowd and, quite possibly, visiting rock
stars, government ministers and Chinese film directors. A giant bar, spacious lounging areas, a stage, a private room, wine
cellars – the Kerry Centre’s bar is well-designed and branded right down to the carpets, but far from being oppressive and
overdone, Centro is a surprisingly comfortable spot to down a drink and do your best Cary Grant impression. Nightly live jazz
performances. Now boasting two happy hours. Happy hour 5-8pm daily.

Drum and Bell 

A terrific location between the Drum and Bell Towers, and an appealing mix of aged furniture. Cultural Revolution memorabilia,
cheap Tsingtao beer, and friendly staff.

  • No name bar 


The oldest Hou Hai bar is also the best, with a ramshackle charm that defeats the copyists. Heated by wood-burning stoves, or
cooled by lake breezes, it’s perfect for year-round.

Pass by Bar 

On a hutong dotted with several hostels, Pass By is a well-established travelers’haunt. Relocated in a restored courtyard
house down a hutong east of Qian Hai in 2002, Tibetan-themed Pass-by is more gathering place than nightspot, with an
extensive English-language library, a useful message board, rotating photo exhibits on the walls, and a good mix of Chinese
and foreign regulars. There’s great Italian food by a chef stolen from Annie’s and a separate nonsmoking section — almost
unheard-of in a Beijing bar. The courtyard is idyllic in summer with outdoor seating. Internet access is available

Red Moon 


Where Beijing’s smart set mingles with Executive Class visitors. This is the sleek house bar of one of the city’s most high-
powered hotels. Dress to impress for cocktails, sushi bar, and cigar lounge. Quality, of course, comes at a price

Souk

Tucked behind Anni’s restaurant near the west gate of Chaoyang park, Souk is where the Middle East (in the form of hookahs
and Lebanese Cuisine) meets the Far east. There are the obligatory Kang-style beds for lounging and a courtyard for al fresco
drinking, as well as weekend DJs..

  • Stone Boat Cafe 


While it may not be as historically significant as its namesake up at the Summer Palace, this Stone Boat does a good latte, it’s
a WiFi hotspot and , come evening, it serves as a unique, candlelit venue for a quiet drink

  • World of Suzie Wong 


The name is from a Richard Mason novel about a prostitute, but this Suzie Wong is wholly respectable and the most famous
bar in Beijing. It set the mark for the “opium den-style” popular in Beijing bar-land and it’s stayed ahead of the pack thanks to
its guaranteed good-time for all. The in-house DJ trio of Bobby, Youdai and Chozie are among the city’s best.

  • Huxley’s 

The house motto is “Shut up and drink.” Not only is this the cheapest bar on the street, it also shows up the other venues as
the pretentious wannabes they really are. Cheap drinks and loud, varied music mean that Huxley’s is best enjoyed with a group
of mates – go alone and you’ll meet plenty in there
Lotus Root 

  • Another fine Yandai Xiejie bar, this one squeezed into a narrow,two-story house with a compact, boho interior and roof terrace

 

  • Guan Tang

Cozy bar with a tranquil atmosphere, although with cocktails at just RMB30 things often don’t stay that tranquil for long

Address: 13 Dongming Hutong

  • East Shore live Jazz Cafe 

Opened by legendary jazzman Liu Yuan – ex-manager of CD Jazz Cafe, the stylish interior of East Shore is hidden behind a
non-descript exterior. Featuring live jazz from Thursday to Sunday, go there for the music, the vibe and the panoramic views of
Qianhai. Drinks are priced as elsewhere in Houhai

  • Xin Bar  

This little gem has colorful Yunnan decorations, leafy foliage, and a roof terrace overlooking the surrounding hutongs. As well
as cheap beer there are ten types of tea.

Jia Fu Teahouse

Modeled after a Qing-era home, this teahouse is filled with antique furniture and often has live Chinese music

Aria  

The China World Hotel has managed to neatly sidestep this usual hotel-bar ennui by situating Aria Bar through a small door
away from their lobby, enclosing it and making it feel separate from the hotel. A great place for an aperitif, before heading
upstairs to Aria Restaurant, it’s also a popular place for an after-work tipple or meeting thanks to the huge wine list and large
selection of hors d’ouevres. The bar stepped up a gear in March 2007 when it headhunted star mixologist Bruce Li.

  • Block  8   


WINNER FOR BEST BARTENDERS, BEST JAZZ Runner Up for: Most Extravagant Bar (The Beach), Best Cocktails, Best
Japanese (Haiku), Best New Restaurant (Haiku), Most Extravagant Restaurant (The Boardroom).

This entertainment complex houses three high end restaurants (Haiku, Med and The Boardroom), a high rolling lounge (i-Ultra
Lounge) and an outdoor patio (The Beach).

  • China Doll (Tongli)

Club China Doll is the unofficial home for international dance music in Beijing. Sexy underground styling, a slick drinks menu
and chic decor make this tri-level warehouse the hottest new addition to the city’s clubbing cohort.

  • Mix 

The Workers Stadium north gate is now officially operating at full capacity. With Vics, Flair and now Mix, clubbers have no
shortage of dance floor space. Mix is Beijing’s own Ghetto Fabulous. A roaster of international guest DJs and cheap drinks
keep the large sunken dance floor pumping ’till the wee hours. The crowd comprises mainly youthful, largely foreign, clubbers
presided over by wannabe B-Boys and their fly-girls. The music is a puzzle, however, with an in-house DJ crew of locals who
paly some upfront beats interspersed with dated ’90s pop. With its cheap drinks and good vibe, Mix is worth a visit.

  • Tango 

A mega club to rival the Gongti park, Tango’s main room is divided into a large dance floor, ample private booths and bar.
Tango’s recent renovations, a joint project between local and European design teams, have resulted in updated decor and
sound, so expect more glitz and glam than ever before. Top floor Mango hosts bands and live acts while the basement carries
on the KTV tradition. Tango has recently joined forces with Bedrock, ensuring that many producers and DJs form the seminal
UK label frequently tour, playing every variety of progressive, house and techno.

  • Vic’s 

This newly renovated dance club plays a mix of R&B, pop, and soul music. They’ve also got a “relaxation zone” playing trance
music. Winner of the “Best Dance Club”  in 2007 Reader Bars and Clubs Awards.

  • The Hong Kong Jockey Club Beijing Clubhouse  


Established over 120 years ago, the Hong Kong Jockey Club is Hong Kong’s most prestigious club. As one of the largest and
most successful horse racing committees and charity organizations in the
world, the Hong Kong Jockey Club has 18,000 members, including top executives and professionals. Over the past ten years,
average annual donations from Jockey Club have exceeded HKD 1 billion, matching donations from the US’ Rockefeller
Foundation.

At the center of Jinbao Street lies the Hong Kong Jockey Club Beijing Clubhouse, an exclusive club that caters to members of
the Hong Kong Jockey Club.

Chang an Club 


Premier downtown dining and athletics club. Members enjoy a global network of over 250 premium clubs.
China Club Beijing  

The exclusive China Club Beijing is located inside a beautifully decorated, 400-year old Qing dynasty palace. Members of the

exclusive China Club pay an initiation fee and annual dues to entertain themselves in a setting straight out of “The Last
Emperor”. The China Club offers a wonderful dining experience.

Duge Courtyard Boutique Hotel

DuGe Courtyard Boutique Hotel is a unique hotel experience in the heart of Beijing’s
trendy Nanluoguxiang Hutong district near historic monument sites such as the Bell
and Drum Towers. DuGe Courtyard Boutique Hotel is a concept and design by
Jehanne de Biolley & Harrison Liu. The refined service offered by the diligent staff is
exceptional.

Duge_Courtyard_Boutique_Hotel_ Suite

The exclusive design is based on the concept of luxury life at home in Beijing. A Qing
Dynasty courtyard has been converted and modernized to fit 10 bedrooms with en-
suite bathrooms. Each room or suite is decorated differently with charm, elegance, and
a great sense of art and fashion.

Duge Courtyard Boutique Hotel

All furniture has been created especially to suite DuGe Courtyard Hotel. Original
antiques and contemporary art works decorate the rooms and suites adding the sense Duge Courtyard Boutique Hotel
of luxury and culture. The name of each room or suite refers to anecdotes from the
Chinese history or culture or has been chosen to describe the atmosphere created by
a chosen art work or decorative feature. Ask for the story when you arrive!