Most Popular Bars and Clubs in Beijing

Beijing’s main expat-friendly boozing district, Sanlitun (Chinese) is famed for its “Bar Street”, more properly known as
Sanlitun Bei Lu, a north-south strip of drinking establishments a long block east of the Workers’ Stadium that at one time
contained practically all of the city’s bars. The fastest-growing spot for late-night drinking is the Back Lakes (Shicha Hai or Hou
Hai), a previously serene spot with a few discreetly fashionable bars north of Bei Hai Park which has exploded into a riot of
neon, capped by the ghastly Lotus Lane. Perhaps the most notable trend is the resurgence of hotel bars, which are the most
appealing and stylish drinking options in Beijing, most notably Centro (Kerry Center), Red Moon (Grand Hyatt) and Aria
Lan Club
Formal, but not intimidating” is how designer Philippe Starck describes his creation. The opulence of this huge luxury venue is
matched by the attention to detail behind the bar, which is stocked with a vast array of European and New World wines. Guests
can choose between a restaurant, a lounge that features live entertainment and DJs most nights, an Oyster Bar, a cocktail bar,
a cigar room and 45 private VIP Rooms.
The Tree
A huge favorite among the city’s expats, formerly the Hidden Tree this place is a convivial, stone-floored pub that marries a
fantastic array of beers (40 Belgian brews alone) with some of the best wood-fired pizzas in Beijing.

Bed Tapas and Bar
A short walk north of the Drum and Bell Towers, Bed Tapas & Bar is the perfect Beijing bar – an old courtyard house kitted out
with antique furniture, including kang-style beds. Excellent food, plus weekend DJs.
Centro
It may be a hotel bar but it’s Beijing’s classiest bar where you can guarantee to find a crowd and, quite possibly, visiting rock
stars, government ministers and Chinese film directors. A giant bar, spacious lounging areas, a stage, a private room, wine
cellars – the Kerry Centre’s bar is well-designed and branded right down to the carpets, but far from being oppressive and
overdone, Centro is a surprisingly comfortable spot to down a drink and do your best Cary Grant impression. Nightly live jazz
performances. Now boasting two happy hours. Happy hour 5-8pm daily.

  • Centro 

It may be a hotel bar but it’s Beijing’s classiest bar where you can guarantee to find a crowd and, quite possibly, visiting rock
stars, government ministers and Chinese film directors. A giant bar, spacious lounging areas, a stage, a private room, wine
cellars – the Kerry Centre’s bar is well-designed and branded right down to the carpets, but far from being oppressive and
overdone, Centro is a surprisingly comfortable spot to down a drink and do your best Cary Grant impression. Nightly live jazz
performances. Now boasting two happy hours. Happy hour 5-8pm daily.

Drum and Bell 

A terrific location between the Drum and Bell Towers, and an appealing mix of aged furniture. Cultural Revolution memorabilia,
cheap Tsingtao beer, and friendly staff.

  • No name bar 


The oldest Hou Hai bar is also the best, with a ramshackle charm that defeats the copyists. Heated by wood-burning stoves, or
cooled by lake breezes, it’s perfect for year-round.

Pass by Bar 

On a hutong dotted with several hostels, Pass By is a well-established travelers’haunt. Relocated in a restored courtyard
house down a hutong east of Qian Hai in 2002, Tibetan-themed Pass-by is more gathering place than nightspot, with an
extensive English-language library, a useful message board, rotating photo exhibits on the walls, and a good mix of Chinese
and foreign regulars. There’s great Italian food by a chef stolen from Annie’s and a separate nonsmoking section — almost
unheard-of in a Beijing bar. The courtyard is idyllic in summer with outdoor seating. Internet access is available

Red Moon 


Where Beijing’s smart set mingles with Executive Class visitors. This is the sleek house bar of one of the city’s most high-
powered hotels. Dress to impress for cocktails, sushi bar, and cigar lounge. Quality, of course, comes at a price

Souk

Tucked behind Anni’s restaurant near the west gate of Chaoyang park, Souk is where the Middle East (in the form of hookahs
and Lebanese Cuisine) meets the Far east. There are the obligatory Kang-style beds for lounging and a courtyard for al fresco
drinking, as well as weekend DJs..

  • Stone Boat Cafe 


While it may not be as historically significant as its namesake up at the Summer Palace, this Stone Boat does a good latte, it’s
a WiFi hotspot and , come evening, it serves as a unique, candlelit venue for a quiet drink

  • World of Suzie Wong 


The name is from a Richard Mason novel about a prostitute, but this Suzie Wong is wholly respectable and the most famous
bar in Beijing. It set the mark for the “opium den-style” popular in Beijing bar-land and it’s stayed ahead of the pack thanks to
its guaranteed good-time for all. The in-house DJ trio of Bobby, Youdai and Chozie are among the city’s best.

  • Huxley’s 

The house motto is “Shut up and drink.” Not only is this the cheapest bar on the street, it also shows up the other venues as
the pretentious wannabes they really are. Cheap drinks and loud, varied music mean that Huxley’s is best enjoyed with a group
of mates – go alone and you’ll meet plenty in there
Lotus Root 

  • Another fine Yandai Xiejie bar, this one squeezed into a narrow,two-story house with a compact, boho interior and roof terrace

 

  • Guan Tang

Cozy bar with a tranquil atmosphere, although with cocktails at just RMB30 things often don’t stay that tranquil for long

Address: 13 Dongming Hutong

  • East Shore live Jazz Cafe 

Opened by legendary jazzman Liu Yuan – ex-manager of CD Jazz Cafe, the stylish interior of East Shore is hidden behind a
non-descript exterior. Featuring live jazz from Thursday to Sunday, go there for the music, the vibe and the panoramic views of
Qianhai. Drinks are priced as elsewhere in Houhai

  • Xin Bar  

This little gem has colorful Yunnan decorations, leafy foliage, and a roof terrace overlooking the surrounding hutongs. As well
as cheap beer there are ten types of tea.

Jia Fu Teahouse

Modeled after a Qing-era home, this teahouse is filled with antique furniture and often has live Chinese music

Aria  

The China World Hotel has managed to neatly sidestep this usual hotel-bar ennui by situating Aria Bar through a small door
away from their lobby, enclosing it and making it feel separate from the hotel. A great place for an aperitif, before heading
upstairs to Aria Restaurant, it’s also a popular place for an after-work tipple or meeting thanks to the huge wine list and large
selection of hors d’ouevres. The bar stepped up a gear in March 2007 when it headhunted star mixologist Bruce Li.

  • Block  8   


WINNER FOR BEST BARTENDERS, BEST JAZZ Runner Up for: Most Extravagant Bar (The Beach), Best Cocktails, Best
Japanese (Haiku), Best New Restaurant (Haiku), Most Extravagant Restaurant (The Boardroom).

This entertainment complex houses three high end restaurants (Haiku, Med and The Boardroom), a high rolling lounge (i-Ultra
Lounge) and an outdoor patio (The Beach).

  • China Doll (Tongli)

Club China Doll is the unofficial home for international dance music in Beijing. Sexy underground styling, a slick drinks menu
and chic decor make this tri-level warehouse the hottest new addition to the city’s clubbing cohort.

  • Mix 

The Workers Stadium north gate is now officially operating at full capacity. With Vics, Flair and now Mix, clubbers have no
shortage of dance floor space. Mix is Beijing’s own Ghetto Fabulous. A roaster of international guest DJs and cheap drinks
keep the large sunken dance floor pumping ’till the wee hours. The crowd comprises mainly youthful, largely foreign, clubbers
presided over by wannabe B-Boys and their fly-girls. The music is a puzzle, however, with an in-house DJ crew of locals who
paly some upfront beats interspersed with dated ’90s pop. With its cheap drinks and good vibe, Mix is worth a visit.

  • Tango 

A mega club to rival the Gongti park, Tango’s main room is divided into a large dance floor, ample private booths and bar.
Tango’s recent renovations, a joint project between local and European design teams, have resulted in updated decor and
sound, so expect more glitz and glam than ever before. Top floor Mango hosts bands and live acts while the basement carries
on the KTV tradition. Tango has recently joined forces with Bedrock, ensuring that many producers and DJs form the seminal
UK label frequently tour, playing every variety of progressive, house and techno.

  • Vic’s 

This newly renovated dance club plays a mix of R&B, pop, and soul music. They’ve also got a “relaxation zone” playing trance
music. Winner of the “Best Dance Club”  in 2007 Reader Bars and Clubs Awards.

  • The Hong Kong Jockey Club Beijing Clubhouse  


Established over 120 years ago, the Hong Kong Jockey Club is Hong Kong’s most prestigious club. As one of the largest and
most successful horse racing committees and charity organizations in the
world, the Hong Kong Jockey Club has 18,000 members, including top executives and professionals. Over the past ten years,
average annual donations from Jockey Club have exceeded HKD 1 billion, matching donations from the US’ Rockefeller
Foundation.

At the center of Jinbao Street lies the Hong Kong Jockey Club Beijing Clubhouse, an exclusive club that caters to members of
the Hong Kong Jockey Club.

Chang an Club 


Premier downtown dining and athletics club. Members enjoy a global network of over 250 premium clubs.
China Club Beijing  

The exclusive China Club Beijing is located inside a beautifully decorated, 400-year old Qing dynasty palace. Members of the

exclusive China Club pay an initiation fee and annual dues to entertain themselves in a setting straight out of “The Last
Emperor”. The China Club offers a wonderful dining experience.

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